Fall in Love with Cycling

A good read:

Why We Fall in Love with Cycling

Brian Surratt, Business Development Director at the City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development:
“People no longer relocate for industry. Industry relocates for talent. Seattle wants to be recognized as a bike-friendly city because it simply helps attract good talent. The most successful cities—economically, culturally, and socially—must compete for intellectual capital and talent.”

Derailer hanger

Irrespective of the frame material, if your bike takes a hit or the shifting gets weird, have us check the derailer hanger. We can straighten or replace it.

The Perils of Progress

Weak hangers flex minutely under load when downshifting, especially under power. If you ever wondered why your bike shifts OK on the stand but not on the road, or have been unable to dial in even a new system and alignment isn’t a question, your derailleur hanger could be part of the problem.

(Aside: Another trend among bikemakers—the return to the internal cable routing craze—can also be a culprit because of the increased friction. Dear bikemakers: Unless it’s an aero road or TT bike, rout cables outside the frame! Internal routing is a pain in the ass, and I hope this trend dies as fast as it did the last time around.)

Or buy a metal bike. Progress is hell.

Peak oil

An article in today’s issue of the science journal Nature considers not how much oil is in the ground but how much can be extracted cheaply. We’re there.

We’ve hit “peak oil”; now comes permanent price volatility

The notion of peak oil is a fairly simple one: oil is a finite resource and, at some point, we simply won’t be able to extract as much as we had previously.

“We are not running out of oil,” the authors argue, “but we are running out of oil that can be produced easily and cheaply.”

Result: volatile oil prices. And volatile gas prices.

Of the 11 recessions the US has experienced since World War II, 10 have been preceded by a sudden change in oil prices.

Further reading:

Has Petroleum Production Peaked, Ending the Era of Easy Oil?

the U.S. spent more than $490 billion on gasoline in 2011

No oil for old countries

Oil ‘tipping point’ has passed with much higher prices to come

(doi:10.1038/481433a)